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Event on Saturday to get DRM out of the Boston Public Library [Feb. 7th, 2008|11:04 am]
The Boston Community

b0st0n

[johnsu01]

DefectiveByDesign.org has announced an action against libraries that support DRM on their collections. Boston locals can join them this Saturday from 1pm to 3pm at the Boston Public Library's main branch, and non-locals are encouraged to stage an action against their own library if it's using DRM.

Read story at Digg

(I'll be there.)

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Comments:
[User Picture]From: thetathx1138
2008-02-07 06:44 pm (UTC)
Much art is moving toward digital from -- it's happening with books, music, visual media. Do you not agree with that?

I don't, actually. I do think digital distribution will be popular in some areas (television and music especially, possibly film rentals, although I'm skeptical), but not in others, and I don't think physical media will fade entirely in ANY area.

What artists make money from DRM?

If a distribution is paid for in some form (bought from a store, watched off of Netflix, etc.), then the artist, at least in theory, receives some form of royalty for their work. If it's downloaded illegally, they don't. It's really that simple. If it prevents illegal downloads, it helps artists get paid.


This is not to say I have any pity for the music industry who, realistically speaking, are the ones really taking it on the chin in terms of piracy. Most major-label musicians don't care about illegal downloads because, honestly, they're unlikely to see any money from any sort of legitimate sale (small label and self-distributed musicians are, of course, another matter).

We're talking about an industry SO corrupt that a platinum-selling band can actually wind up owing their label money, and have absolutely no control over how the songs on that album are used (ringtones, advertisements, etc.)! So, honestly, what do they care? Somebody's downloading an MP3? Great! That's more promotion for the tour, the merchandise, the fan club, the stuff that might actually make them money and keep them playing music.

Reznor is a great example of this: he will never see another penny from several of his albums due to the label that owned them collapsing and the rights being sold off. Royalty arrangements are separate from rights, so he's shafted. This is why I'm not going to buy a new copy of those albums; at least if I buy a used copy there's a possibility he might have seen a nickel out of that sale.
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